Tag Archives: reading

What I’ve Been Reading : The Home For Unwanted Girls and My Absolute Darling

my-absolute-darling-woods

I’ve been reading books very quickly lately.  My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent was a page turner for me. I was drawn into this strange world and even stranger circumstances and hoped for a happy ending. I read this book in just a few days and I recommend it if you’re up for reading through uncomfortable and unimaginable situations. Curious?

The Home for Unwanted Girls by Joanna Goodman was read in 3 days, thanks to my new reading chair. This historical fiction had me in its grasp almost immediately. The story is interesting enough but the whole part about the Quebec orphanages turning into mental institutions, and its orphans into patients, in the 50s was fascinating and sad. It’s a book I highly recommend if you can stomach a heart-wrenching story of abandonment and greed.

Reading anything good? I’m on a roll!

Fernie Family Literacy Day – January 24th

Fernie Family Literacy Day - Fernie Heritage Library

From Facebook:

“A special event to celebrate family literacy for ALL AGES – from early years to seniors. Join us for a night of pizza, writing, storytelling and making! We will be creating books with family stories, written from our roots. Writing stations, prompts and all materials provided. Brought to you by the Fernie Heritage Library and Fernie Early Years Team
REGISTRATION REQUIRED (or for more info) email fhlprogrammer@gmail.com. Limited spaces available.”

January 24th, 5:30-7:30pm
at Fernie Heritage Library

Music Break : If You Really Love Nothing (Reimagined by Pêtr Aleksänder)


I got home from school drop off and came to my computer, like I do every morning after drop off, and opened Spotify. Looking for something different to listen to, I clicked on the Release Radar mix. The first song I heard was this and I felt it was just the perfect song for this morning.

I’ve been reading a book called Road Ends by Mary Lawson. It’s about a family who lives in northern Ontario, set in the late 1960s, and the struggles they deal with from their past and present. The mother locks herself in her room with her newborn and slowly fades away, completely obliviously to the rest of the family, the father lives a life of regret and fails to step up to his role as father, and the kids, well, the kids are surviving the best they know how. About 15 pages from the end I put the book down and I cleaned up all the toys on the floor I’ve been ignoring, put away all the drawings my kids have 1/2 finished that just sit around the house, I put away clothes on the floor that I pretend aren’t there and threw out a banana peel from under the coffee table that looked like I caught it just in time. Life can get away from you. I get it but I don’t want that. I want to step up. My kids deserve to be kids and I should be there to support them and show them how to love even when things aren’t going our way. Gosh, books, I love them. I love music, too. Now it’s time to draw!

Hail To Davidson

Craig Davidson's The Saturday Night Ghost Club New Book

I was just online browsing for images of this crazy hail storm on highway 22 when I found this other link and then another link. In the second link I found some really good information that I feel compelled to share. The same author who wrote Precious Cargo has written a new novel titled The Saturday Night Ghost Club and it comes out this August. Well, look how things turned around there! From hail to a new Davidson book. Things are look up!

What I’ve Been Reading : The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Book I've Read - The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksWow. What a book. This one had me from page one. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot tells the story of Henrietta Lacks and the immortal cancer cells that were taken from her body, and how they took over the world.

This book is about much more than just some cells that won’t die. It’s about how the Lack family (a poor, uneducated black family from a tobacco farm) felt when they found out Henrietta’s cells were still alive and making some people very rich.

Ah! But the book is also about who has rights to cells once they’ve been taken from a body, whether that body is dead or alive. It’s a very interesting question that I would never have thought about otherwise. I had a mole removed a few years ago, do I have any rights to that sample once it leaves my body?

The author does an astounding job of showing as many sides of the story as she can. The doctors, the Lacks family and friends, the scientists, the people cured from various diseases thanks to HeLa cells, the journalists and the hospital where Henrietta Lacks went for cancer treatment and died.

Read it. You won’t regret it.

And that’s in my uneducated opinion.